Materials, Design & Engineering for Sensor Manufacturing

 

感測器製造之材料、設計、技術

12月10日(二)

7:30 am Registration and Morning Coffee

Plenary Session

8:20 Chairperson's Remarks

Christopher Hartshorn, PhD, Program Director, Cancer Treatment & Diagnosis, National Institutes of Health; National Cancer Institute

8:30 Predictive Analytics in Digital Diagnostics for Management of Chronic Conditions

Rafael Carbunaru, PhD, Vice President R&D, Boston Scientific

9:00 Regulatory Considerations during Mobile Medical App Development for Commercial and Clinical Trial Use

Mike Benecky, Senior Director, Global Regulatory Affairs in Precision and Digital Medicine, GlaxoSmithKline

Mobile medical apps are defined as medical devices from their intended use. Mobile medical app regulation is health risk-based to balance patient safety and barriers to technological innovation. Medical device patient risk analysis is a critical prerequisite prior to sensor/app inclusion within a clinical trial. Key components of quality management systems for mobile medical apps include: software requirements/specifications, user acceptance testing, software postmarket surveillance, software version control, and medical device adverse event reporting.             

9:30 Nanotechnology, MEMS, Microfluidics for Health 4.0 Hypermobility

Ali Tinazli, PhD, Senior Director & Head, Healthcare & Life Sciences Strategy, Hewlett-Packard, HP Inc., CTO Office

New imperatives of healthcare are focusing on prevention, personalization of diagnostics and treatment, and democratization, including access to everyone, anywhere, anytime at a low cost. The technology convergence in medicine is enabled by the powerful combination of microelectronics, microfluidics, distributed network, and data analytics.

10:00 Networking Coffee Break

10:30 Roundtable Discussions

Market and the Path to Commercialization

11:25 Chairperson's Remarks

Steve Lerner, CEO, Alpha Szenszor

11:30 BARDA’s New Division of Research Innovation for the Development of Next-Generation Wearables

Justin Yang, Program Officer, Acting Program Manager, Early Notification to Act, Control and Treat (ENACT) Program, DRIVe Division, Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority in the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response, U.S. Department of Health & Human Services

This presentation will provide an overview of the vision of the Biomedical Advanced Research & Development Authority's new Division of Research, Innovation, and Ventures in the Department of Health and Human Services and their new focus on wearable technologies. We are funding multiple projects seeking to improve healthcare and health outcomes by enabling Americans to monitor their own health. We seek wearable technologies to enable a notification of impending disease before symptoms arise.

Advanced Sensor Materials & Engineering

12:00 pm Miniaturization Technologies for Implantable Devices

Robert Rubino, Senior Director, Research and Development, Integer

In order to make future implantable medical devices as minimally invasive and cost-effective as possible, devices will need to become smaller and easier to implant. This will require the development of alternative assembly technologies and materials. Reduction in the size of the power source, while still retaining the high level of reliability required, will be one critical element to reduce device size. New concepts to allow for miniature scale assembly of hermetic, biocompatible coin cells and thin film cells have been developed by leveraging traditional glass-to-metal and ceramic-to-metal seal technologies. Ceramic  device enclosures, which allow for more efficient energy transfer to the device from external power sources due to reduced eddy currents, have been developed to minimize recharge time or eliminate the need for a power source completely. In addition, biocompatible, hermetic conductive vias through ceramic substrates enable further size reduction of device feedthroughs and can act as active electrodes for sensing or therapy. Combined, these technologies can be used to produce sensing and stimulating implants that provide enhanced convenience for patients and physicians.

12:30 Sponsored Presentation (Opportunity Available)

1:00 Enjoy Lunch on Your Own

Advanced Sensor Materials and Engineering

1:55 Chairperson's Remarks

Roger Grace, President, Roger Grace Associates

2:00 Radio Ranging with Ultra-High Resolution with Passive Markers

Edwin Kahn, PhD, Principal Investigator & Professor, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, College of Engineering, Cornell University

Accurate locating of specific points in an indoor setting is critical for applications, including robotic feedback control and non-intrusive structural integrity monitoring. Current optical and ultrasound approaches often suffer from insufficient accuracy, obstruction by other objects, and ambiguous identification. Alternatively, conventional radar-like radio frequency (RF) methods can suffer from problems such as multipath ambiguity, small time of flight, and limited item recognition. Attachment of a passive RF identification (RFID) tag can provide a unique marker by modulating the backscattering signal, but current systems struggle with large interference and noise, and thus have poor ranging accuracy. Here we show that a 1 GHz harmonic RFID system can provide a ranging resolution of less than 50 microns in air and less than 5 microns in water with a sampling rate of greater than 1 kHz. The fundamental limits on ranging precision in our system are traced to the phase noise of the RF source and the aperture jitter of the data converter. Due to the low signal loss of the RF band we choose, the small passive tag to be precisely tracked can be embedded in underwater objects as well as within building structures.

2:30 Low Power, Highly Scaled IoT Gas Sensors Using Carbon Nanotubes

Steve Lerner, CEO, Alpha Szenszor

In the world of gas sensors that currently contend for Edge-based detection, incumbent technologies carry significant limitations with respect to integration, cost and power consumption. Sensor power consumption is a fundamental constraint for all portable sensing devices, particularly as the vision of energy harvesting and ubiquitous sensing at the Edge materialize. More recently, Carbon Nanotube sensors have evolved to being one of the most cost-effective options with greater packing density, higher sensitivity and selectivity, than most gas sensors, while consuming up to 3 orders of magnitude less power. This talk will discuss the inherent advantages of ultra-low power gas sensors and some of the applications that are being enabled as a result. From medical diagnostics to fitness monitors to environmental applications analyzing the quality of air, soil, water and food. CNT sensors are positioned to revolutionize our automated sense of smell and taste.

3:00 The Integration of Flexible Tactile Sensors into Biomedical and Consumer Products

Robert Podoloff, CTO, Tekscan; Lecturer, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

This talk will focus on the information that flexible tactile sensors can provide and the process for integrating them into consumer products. Several applications examples ranging from prevention of occlusion in insulin delivery lines to the measurement of dynamic automobile tire footprints will be presented along with a live demonstration of the technology.

3:30 Refreshment Break in the Exhibit Hall with Poster Viewing

4:00 Tutorials (See page 3 for details.)

6:00 Welcome Reception in the Exhibit Hall with Poster Viewing

7:00 End of Day

12月11日(三)

8:00 am Registration and Morning Coffee

Plenary Session

8:20 Chairperson's Remarks

Robert Rubino, Senior Director, Research and Development, Integer

8:30 Dexcom's Continuous Glucose Monitoring (CGM) Technology and Its Impact on Diabetes Management, Artificial Pancreas, & Digital Health Systems

Peter Simpson, Vice President of Sensor R&D and Advanced Technology, Dexcom

Recent advances in continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) technology have significantly increased its usability and impact on diabetes management.  CGM's are now widely reimbursed and are rapidly becoming the standard of care for people on intensive insulin therapy.This presentation will provide an overview of Dexcom's CGM sensor technology, its use in digital health and artificial pancreas systems and a preview of our future products.

9:00 Objective Measures for Clinical Assessment and Precise Understanding of Disease Progression

Christopher Hartshorn, PhD, Program Director, Cancer Treatment & Diagnosis, National Institutes of Health; National Cancer Institute

This talk will look at various efforts across the National Institutes of Health attempting to enable more objective measures for out-of-clinic, patient-specific assessment and longitudinal understanding of disease progression in large cohorts.

9:30 Wearable Electrochemical Sensors - Recent Advances

Joseph Wang, Distinguished Professor & Chair, Nanoengineering, University of California, San Diego

This presentation will discuss recent developments in the field of wearable electrochemical sensors integrated directly on the epidermis or within the mouth for various non-invasive biomedical monitoring applications. Particular attention will be given to non-invasive monitoring of metabolites and electrolytes using flexible amperometric and potentiometric sensors, respectively, along with related materials, energy and integration considerations. The preparation and characterization of such wearable electrochemical sensors will be described, along with their current status, future prospects, and challenges. 

10:00 Coffee Break in the Exhibit Hall with Poster Viewing

10:30 Roundtable Discussions

Enabling Sensor Commercialization through Collaborative Initiatives

11:25 Chairperson's Remarks

Robert Rubino, Senior Director, Research and Development, Integer

11:30 The NNI Sensors Signature Initiative: Facilitating Collaboration to Advance Nanosensor Development and Commercialization

Stacey Standridge, PhD, Deputy Director, National Nanotechnology Coordination Office

The NNI’s Nanotechnology for Sensors and Sensors for Nanotechnology Signature Initiative (Sensors NSI) coordinates efforts and stimulates existing and emerging projects across federal agencies to explore the use of nanotechnology for the development and commercialization of sensors. This presentation will provide an update regarding current and planned activities of the Sensors NSI, with specific focus on needs, funding opportunities, and recent activities related to wearable and implantable sensors. The NNI is a U.S. Government research and development initiative involving 20 departments and independent agencies working together toward the shared vision of “a future in which the ability to understand and control matter at the nanoscale leads to a revolution in technology and industry that benefits society.”

12:00 pm ANSI, the Value of Its Public-Private Partnership

Michelle Dean, Director of Standards Facilitation, American National Standards Institute

ANSI enhances both the global competitiveness of U.S. business and the U.S. quality of life by promoting and facilitating voluntary consensus standards and conformity assessment systems, and safeguarding their integrity. One of the great strengths of the U.S. approach to standards and conformance is its “public-private partnership.” This presentation will provide an overview of this partnership, the U.S. standards process and how the Institute bridges the gap between industry and government and enables information exchange and access among standards developing organizations and public-sector leaders, agencies, and legislators.

12:30 Sponsored Presentation (Opportunity Available)

1:00 Enjoy Lunch on Your Own

Sensor Design and Engineering for Manufacturing

1:55 Chairperson's Remarks

Stacey Standridge, PhD, Deputy Director, National Nanotechnology Coordination Office

2:00 Sputtered Metal Oxide N-P Heterojunctions for Sub-PPM Volatile Organic Compound Sensing

Luisa Bozano, PhD, Manager, Nanoscale Fabrication Group, IBM Almaden Research Center

We present the fabrication and characterization of sputtered SnO2/NiO n-p heterojunctions thin films and their response to Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) at sub-ppm concentrations. In optimal processing conditions, the response of the films to VOCs can be greatly increased and its dependence on temperature, typically described in the context of a Diffusion-Reaction model, altered. In addition, we show that p-type NiO layers of given thickness can trigger a reversal in the response pattern of ultra-thin n-type SnO2 underlayers.

2:30 Embedded System Ingration

Francois Beauchaud, Principal Engineer, Bus Dev, Bosch RTC

3:00 Cost Versus Power in Embedded Sensor System Design

Mark Buccini, Director Advanced Product Platforms, Advanced Product Platforms, Texas Instruments

This session documents proven embedded sensor system design techniques that both reduce cost and reduce power system consumption, in many cases by an order of magnitude. A clear case study of a battery-powered sensor system is presented with optimization alternatives. Benefits are quantified. A functional example including temperature, light, proximity and motion sensing will be discussed and demonstrated live during this session. 

3:30 Refreshment Break in the Exhibit Hall with Poster Viewing

4:00 Tutorials (See page 3 for details.)

6:00 End of Day

* 活動內容有可能不事先告知作更動及調整。

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